Read e-book online An introduction to Greek tragedy PDF

By Ruth Scodel

ISBN-10: 0511781237

ISBN-13: 9780511781230

ISBN-10: 0511902425

ISBN-13: 9780511902420

ISBN-10: 0521705606

ISBN-13: 9780521705608

ISBN-10: 0521879744

ISBN-13: 9780521879743

"This booklet offers a short and obtainable creation to Greek tragedy for college students and normal readers alike. no matter if readers are learning Greek tradition, acting a Greek tragedy, or just attracted to interpreting a Greek play, this ebook can assist them to appreciate and revel in this not easy and lucrative style. An advent to Greek Tragedy offers heritage details; is helping readers savor, enjoy, Read more...

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Even though the theater of Dionysus was large, it could not begin to accommodate the potential audience, so there would be many who would be eager to see a play that was being talked about, and doubtless many who would be eager to see it again. ” But they may also have premiered the tragedies of poets who had not yet been granted a chorus in the city. Athenian tragedy also interested Greeks outside Athens, and, beginning in the late fifth century, performances outside Athens took place not only when a wealthy king chose to patronize a poet, but in various cities.

Origins, Festival, and Competition╇ /╇ 43 Then there were rural festivals. The demes€– the smallest units of government in Attica, originally villages and neighborhoods€ – held performances of tragedy at their celebrations of the Rural Dionysia or at other festivals. Most of the evidence comes from the fourth century BCE. These sometimes encored plays that had been well received at the major festivals. Even though the theater of Dionysus was large, it could not begin to accommodate the potential audience, so there would be many who would be eager to see a play that was being talked about, and doubtless many who would be eager to see it again.

Odysseus is an admirable character in Ajax, despicable in Philoctetes, both by Sophocles. There is no fixed consistency of character from play to play. Although Odysseus is always clever and persuasive, he can be compassionate or ruthless. Menelaus sometimes conforms to the Athenian stereotype of the arrogant, bullying Spartan€– but not always. A few tragedies used material from recent history, and the audience of Persians knew very well that Aeschylus did not know how the Persian court had reacted to the Athenians’ defeat of the Persians at the battle of Salamis.

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An introduction to Greek tragedy by Ruth Scodel


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